Friday, August 11, 2017

A Cock and Bull Story: An everyday tale of non country folk

A visual representation of recent National Trust policies.Note to NT legal representatives-Image not shot on NT property!
 
Well...that wasn't expected! The blog piece of a few days ago detailing the National Trust of England & Wales' controversial approach to image rights when dealing with commercial photographs, really put the cat amongst the pigeons!  The number of page visits went off the scale and I was approached by several national media organisations who wanted to interview the photographer in question who had approached me with the information after reading my blog about what we should call, 'The Glencoe Affair'. Sadly for them, my informant wishes to remain anonymous but he/she felt that my article more or less captured the essence of the NT's position on image rights in England and Wales.

With over 60 comments under the piece, it's fair to say the overwhelming majority of comments were from those who were, to put it mildly, not well disposed towards the National Trust. 'greedy', 'expensive', 'out of touch' and 'tartan rugs and overpriced wax jackets' featured amongst the comments! How did it come to this? This is an organisation with 4.2m members and among them 60,000 volunteers. Our political parties would die for those sort of figures. If the National Trust represents the wholesome embodiment of Middle England's 'Countryfile' view what constitutes a conservation and preservation organisation, then it's clear that many of those 4.2 million members, share the reservations of people like myself, who have been critics of the NT on several issues over the past few years.


The Glencoe and Image Rights issues in many ways are just the tip of a PR iceberg as far as the Trust is concerned. It's approach to hunting and bloodsports on its land, its hazy policies on wind farms and renewable energy projects on NT estates etc etc, are just some of the issues which have antagonised both member and non member alike. Whilst these latter projects are considered good PR and are generally well received by the average metropolitan Guardianist, many conservationists question for example, why a scheme like the Hafod Llan hydro-power development which was constructed on the Trust's eponymous estate, near Beddgelert in north Wales, was necessary?

Especially when the rash of these developments across Snowdonia-with ugly scars being torn out of the mountainside- are considered by many to be rather pointless, profit driven exercises, considering the minimal electricity output and the visual impact that comes in train with their development.

Compare the National Trust's management of the rural environment with a genuine conservation movement like the John Muir Trust. An organisation which is totally in tune with the natural environment and the people who live and work within this environment. Although compared to the both the Scottish and England & Wales Trusts, the JMT would be considered as small fry with regard to membership and land ownership. It remains a model of how a conservation organisation can sympathetically balance its role as a guardian and protector of the natural world on its estates while taking a realistic approach to social and cultural issues. NT take note!

Anyway...that's enough National Trust blog pieces for now. Normal service will be resumed asap!

 

1 comment:

  1. The Glencoe incident is Natural Trust for Scotland. The photo issues are National Trust. These are two separate, although equally despicable, organisations.

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